Extended hours for free income tax help at Highline College

United Way and Highline continue partnership, add morning, Saturday hours.

Community members can get their taxes done for free, thanks to a partnership between United Way of King County and Highline College. Households that make less than $66,000 are eligible, provided tax returns are not too complex.

IRS-certified volunteers will prepare returns as long as they do not involve income earned in other states, business taxes, rental income or sale of property or stocks. No appointment is necessary. Those who arrive first will be served first.

This community service is available three days a week through April 18 in Building 1 (east entrance) on Highline’s main campus. Morning hours are available for the first time:

• Monday: 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

• Thursday: 4:30–8:30 p.m.

• Saturday: 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

Customers will need to bring the following:

• Social Security cards/individual tax identification numbers (ITINs) and birth dates for everyone who will be listed on the return.

• Photo ID.

• All tax statements, including forms such as W-2, 1099 and SSA-1099.

• Health insurance forms 1095-A, 1095-B or 1095-C.

If filing jointly with a spouse, both must be present to e-file.

Bringing bank account numbers, routing numbers and a copy of last year’s tax return is also highly recommended.

In 2018, customers received more than $700,000 in refunds at Highline’s tax site, where volunteers prepared nearly 450 returns.

In addition to tax preparation, community members can be screened for other public benefits such as health care, food stamps and reduced transit fare, called ORCA LIFT. This service is available through Highline’s partnership with WithinReach, an organization that helps Washington families connect with resources and navigate health and social services systems.

For questions or more information, visit United Ways’ Free Tax Help page, email freetax@uwkc.org or call 800-621-4636.

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