Sen. Claire Wilson, members of Federal Way City Council, King County Council member Pete von Reichbauer, and other local leaders pose for a photo with the dedicated time capsule plaque. Olivia Sullivan/the Mirror

Sen. Claire Wilson, members of Federal Way City Council, King County Council member Pete von Reichbauer, and other local leaders pose for a photo with the dedicated time capsule plaque. Olivia Sullivan/the Mirror

Hello from 2020: Federal Way’s time capsule to be buried soon

Mayor Jim Ferrell hosted a dedication ceremony on Friday, Nov. 6.

Pieces of Federal Way’s history from 2020 will soon be buried in Town Square Park, where they will remain in the city’s time capsule for 30 years.

Mayor Jim Ferrell hosted a dedication ceremony for the time capsule on Nov. 6. The outdoor ceremony welcomed more than 50 community members, politicians, local leaders, contributors and more.

“On the 30th anniversary of the City of Federal Way, it is only fitting to not only reflect and document the last 30 years of our city, but to also communicate with our future residents 30 years in the future,” Ferrell said.

The time capsule is a 5 foot-long and 22.5 inch-deep cement vault that will soon be filled with artifacts from the city, such as the first-ever Pride Flag, a construction helmet from Sound Transit, the Federal Way Mirror’s Nov. 6 front page, along with notes and donations from local residents and dozens more contributions.

Friday’s dedication ceremony was held on the plaza outside of the Performing Arts and Event Center near the Town Center Steps, which will also be the site of the capsule’s plaque. The capsule itself will be buried in an undisclosed location in Town Square Park below.

The time capsule can also be considered a time machine, Ferrell said, and will be “an enthusiastic ‘hello,’” from 2020.

A key force behind the “time machine” is Diana Noble-Guilford, president of the volunteer-run Federal Way Historical Society. She helped advocate for and organize the local groups to be represented, along with assembly and preservation of artifacts.

“Our mission statement is to preserve our history for future generations, and that is exactly what this time capsule does,” Noble-Guilford said, noting the importance of documenting the year 2020 — already a historical year in itself.


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Federal Way Historical Society President Diana Noble-Guilford speaks at the Nov. 6 event. Olivia Sullivan/the Mirror

Federal Way Historical Society President Diana Noble-Guilford speaks at the Nov. 6 event. Olivia Sullivan/the Mirror

Mayor Jim Ferrell holds the time capsule plaque on Nov. 6. Olivia Sullivan/the Mirror

Mayor Jim Ferrell holds the time capsule plaque on Nov. 6. Olivia Sullivan/the Mirror

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