Lawmakers advance a voluntary waiver of gun rights for those at risk of suicide

Under the proposed law, it would take those who volunteer 14 days to retain their right to a firearm.

Jamie Pedersen is the bill’s sponsor. Courtesy photo

Jamie Pedersen is the bill’s sponsor. Courtesy photo

A bill giving people at risk of suicide the option to voluntarily give up their right to keep a firearm passed the Senate Law and Justice Committee unanimously. The next step for the bill is the Rules Committee before it gets a hearing in the House of Representatives.

Senate Bill 5553, sponsored by Senator Jamie Pedersen, D-Seattle, was introduced and heard last year. Pedersen is now chair of the Law and Justice Committee starting this session.

“While we know not any one policy will solve all gun violence or prevent all gun suicides, giving people the option to voluntarily flag that they may be in crisis and they don’t want to have access to firearms during that crisis, is an important step they can take,” Rebecca Johnson with the Alliance for Gun Responsibility said at the bill’s hearing last year.

She acknowledged that people already have a legal right to turn over any firearm they already own to a trusted friend or family member. This bill would give people with suicidal thoughts another safety tool.

Jennifer Stuber, who lost her husband to suicide, is the director of Forefront at the University of Washington, an organization focusing on suicide prevention policy, education, and research. Stuber cited the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention data showing 1,129 suicide deaths in Washington state in 2015. Noting that about half of those deaths involved a firearm, Stuber said this bill was drafted on common ground and takes an important step toward suicide prevention while maintaining individual autonomy.

Keely Hopkins, state liaison for the National Rifle Association, expressed concerns about individual autonomy. She said a person who is not a risk to themselves or others could be coerced into waiving their firearm rights. She also worries that health care providers may require the waiver as a term of service or employers might require the waiver as a term of employment.

Last week, the bill passed out of committee with an amendment that prohibits employers or healthcare providers from using the waiver as a term of employment or service. The waivers are also exempt from the Public Records Act and they must be destroyed after someone retains their firearm rights.

Under the bill, someone can retain their firearm rights after a period of seven days and the Washington State Patrol has to process the waiver and retain that person’s rights within another seven days.

Hopkins requested a shorter time period in which someone can retain their rights.

“Fourteen days could be an eternity for somebody who needs a firearm for self protection,” she said.

The Law and Justice Committee heard an amendment that would change the period where the person’s firearm rights are rescinded from seven days to 48 hours. However, this amendment was not adopted because committee members believe that a mental health crisis can last for more than 48 hours and seven days is not a significant infringement on someone’s second amendment rights.

Suicide is a public health issue. If you need help please call the suicide lifeline at 800-273-8255, the teen lifeline at 866-833-6546 or text 741741 for the crisis text line. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 800-273-TALK (8255). Counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Source: Washington State Department of Health.

This report was produced by the Olympia bureau of the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association.


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@federalwaymirror.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.federalwaymirror.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

More in Northwest

t
State legislation to promote recycling, reduce plastic waste becomes law

Will ban polystyrene food ware, recreational coolers and packing peanuts

Jeff Duchin, Seattle - King County Public Health officer, said when considering whether to wear a mask indoors in public spaces, people should understand their risk based on local coronavirus activity and make decisions based on their own risk tolerance. (Getty images)
Should you keep masking up if you’re vaccinated?

Think about it, says King County’s top doctor.

The Center Bar at Muckleshoot Casino in Auburn. COURTESY PHOTO, Muckleshoot Casino
Muckleshoot Tribe reaches sport betting agreement with state

State Gambling Commission to allow sports wagering at Auburn casino

t
State Patrol leads multi-agency effort to stop street racing

Racers take over streets/freeways in King, Pierce and Snohomish counties

Courtesy Photo, Kent School District
State Department of Health releases updated K-12 school guidance

Schools must plan to provide full time in-person education this fall

(Pixabay.com)
As rates of stoned drivers increase, law enforcement face challenges

WSP trooper said a THC breathalyzer would be a “game changer” for law enforcement and courts.

E. coli. Photo courtesy of the Food and Drug Administration
Seven King County children sickened with E. coli

Seven children in King County have been infected with E. coli, a… Continue reading

Sound Publishing file photo
Remi Frederick, a Village Green employee, receives her first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine on Jan. 26 in Federal Way.
County health officer looks to community immunity instead of herd immunity

Herd immunity may be unlikely to reach King County anytime soon, but… Continue reading

Courtesy Photo, Public Health - Seattle & King County
Bat positive for rabies found in King County

Sammamish resident bit multiple times

Most Read