Geneva Woods, a former resident of Life Care Center of Kirkland, enjoys homemade potato soup while staying at Harborview Medical Center, which she requests from her family daily. Photo courtesy of Kate Neidigh

Geneva Woods, a former resident of Life Care Center of Kirkland, enjoys homemade potato soup while staying at Harborview Medical Center, which she requests from her family daily. Photo courtesy of Kate Neidigh

90-year-old Life Care resident recovering after testing positive for COVID-19

Geneva Wood remains in isolation at Harborview Medical Center.

After testing positive for coronavirus earlier this month, Geneva Wood now appears to be on the mend.

The 90-year-old was a resident at Life Care Center of Kirkland and brought to the long-term care facility in January after she had a stroke.

By mid to late February, when coronavirus (COVID-19) cases began to surface stateside, Wood was struck with a fever and her family members became immediately concerned.

By March 5, Wood was transferred over to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle and got tested for the coronavirus. By the following day, the test results came back positive.

Wood’s family members, which include her four living children, 11 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren describe her as a “bat out of hell,” due to her will to live. After her stroke, Wood regained the capability to walk, use her right arm and speak.

While at Harborview, Wood’s four children rushed to her side to support her amidst the pandemic, but the closest they could get to their mother was outside of her room, with a barrier in between. As her symptoms worsened, Wood relayed to her daughter, Cami Neidigh, through the door’s glass window, “I’m going to fight this for my family and make everyone proud.”

At this point in time, Wood’s doctors had little hope for her recovery. Her children suited up in personal protective equipment and went into the room to say their final goodbyes.

“It was a gift and at the same time cruel,” Neidigh said. “We could touch her hand, rub her arm through the gloves. No hugging.”

Wood was moved to a new room with another patient who had also tested positive for COVID-19.

Suddenly, her symptoms began to improve. By March 17, Wood was fully off of an oxygen tank and she had few symptoms remaining. That same day, she tested negative for coronavirus and as of March 18, she still had a stuffy nose and some coughing.

Her doctors relayed that Wood needs to be asymptomatic for 72 hours before she can be cleared and discharged.

The family is waiting for another negative test result which will take place on March 20 or 21. Once Wood is discharged, the family plans to keep her in isolation at home and away from others for public safety precautions.

“I feel it’s important to give people some hope. Getting this virus is not a death sentence for the elderly or anybody,” said Neidigh.


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@federalwaymirror.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.federalwaymirror.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

Geneva Woods, a former resident of Life Care Center of Kirkland, enjoys homemade potato soup while staying at Harborview Medical Center, which she requests from her family daily. Photo courtesy of Kate Neidigh

Geneva Woods, a former resident of Life Care Center of Kirkland, enjoys homemade potato soup while staying at Harborview Medical Center, which she requests from her family daily. Photo courtesy of Kate Neidigh

More in Northwest

UW doctor offers answers about COVID-19

Who should get tested? Who can get coronavirus? Staying at home key to stop spreading

Washington scrambles to boost supply of life-saving protective items for healthcare workers

State officials say they had to be “creative” to obtain protective equipment in global demand.

Gov. Jay Inslee discusses the COVID-19 pandemic and the state’s response during a press conference on Thursday, March 26. Screenshot
Inslee: Stay-at-home orders must continue to completely eliminate COVID-19

Slight decrease in rate of new coronavirus cases, but residents must continue to hunker down.

COVID-19 gathering restriction delays funerals

For one funeral home owner, the confusion came to a head after a recent service.

Legislators request unemployment assistance for independent contractors

Federal funds for hairdressers, high tech coders and others

Activists want rent, mortgage suspensions

Moratoriums on evictions won’t be enough, say some.

Governor: Stay at home — and that’s now an order

Jay Inslee on Monday took an aggressive new step to curb social interactions as coronavirus deaths rise.

Most Read