Task force will tackle issues of racial justice, police reform

Inslee names civil rights activists, pastors, and cops to panel that may forge ideas for new laws

Courtesy image

Courtesy image

Staff report

OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay Inslee on Monday named a 24-member task force to examine issues of policing and racial justice, and try to forge recommendations for legislation on independent investigations involving police use of force.

Black Lives Matter, NAACP, Latino Civic Alliance, Equal Rights Washington and Disability Rights Washington are among the organizations represented. The panel also includes a relative of Charleena Lyles, a pregnant mother shot and killed in her home by Seattle police in 2017, and a member of the John T. Williams Organizing Committee, named for the Native American woodcarver who was walking across the street carrying his carving knife and a small piece of wood when he was shot and killed by a Seattle police officer in 2010.

A county prosecuting attorney, and representatives of state troopers, sheriffs, police officers and the City of Seattle Office of Police Accountability are participating. A complete list of members can be found online at www.governor.wa.gov.

Task force members will review the investigative protocols under I-940, the voter-approved measure aimed at curbing the use of deadly force by law enforcement officers. The panel will consider other independent investigation models, and provide input to help inform legislation for the 2021 session, according to a press release. Inslee announced formation of the task force earlier this month. The panel will hold its first meeting in July.




Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@federalwaymirror.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.federalwaymirror.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

More in News

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Surge in consumer spending eases state budget challenges

A jump in tax collections cuts a projected $9 billion shortfall in half, acccording to new forecast.

The stress of current events impacting minorities and members of the LGBTQ+ community cannot be ignored, said DeAunte’ Damper, the first LGBTQ chair of the Seattle - King County NAACP. “Because of COVID, our community isn’t getting the resources they need, so we wanted to provide that,” said Damper, pictured here in a screenshot from a video on Facebook.
Free community mental health day in Federal Way

Free mental health services, COVID-19 testing from 2-7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 26 at the PAEC

Two puppies stolen from Federal Way home | Police blotter

Following is a sample from the Federal Way police log Sept. 15-22.

Federal Way shows support for South King firefighters

A drive-thru donation event on Sept. 12 collected about $500 for the South King Firefighters Foundation

Screenshot from fredhutch.org
Fred Hutch seeks volunteers of color for COVID-19 study

Research company recently released a Spanish-language version of the website for accessibility, inclusivity.

High speed rail and hub cities explored in Cascadia Corridor study

A new paper outlines a potential plan for the region.

Olivia Sullivan/staff photo
Federal Way flags at half-staff in memory of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Justice Ginsburg died at age 87 on Friday, Sept. 18.

Double duty: South King firefighter serves country in Washington Army National Guard

Jason Koffarnus recently achieved 20 years of military service, now preparing for Eastern Europe deployment.

Should state cover school bus costs if there are no riders?

With funding tied to getting students to school, districts are uncertain how much money they’ll receive.

Most Read