Courtesy image

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Federal Way City Council, Mayor celebrate Black History Month with proclamation

Proclamation recognizes the ‘valuable and lasting’ contributions made by the African American community to Federal Way.

The Federal Way City Council made a proclamation honoring February as Black History Month at their Feb. 2 meeting.

Black History Month was established in 1962 by Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, encouraging unity and promoting American ideal of equal education, social and economic opportunities for all people, according to the proclamation signed by Federal Way Mayor Jim Ferrell and the Federal Way City Council members.

Much of Federal Way’s honor, strength and distinction “can be attributed to the diversity of cultures and traditions that are celebrated by the residents of this great region,” the city proclamation begins.

The proclamation notes the African American community has played a historically significant role in both the national and state economic, cultural, spiritual and political developments “while working tirelessly to promote their culture and history.”

Because of this dedication and perseverance, African Americans have made “valuable and lasting” contributions to the Federal Way community, earning “exceptional success in all aspects of society.”

The proclamation urges Americans to look toward and help build a society centered on freedom, equality and justice. Federal Way “believes in the equality of all people and recognizes the value added to our community by our diversity.”

Among the speakers was Pastor Joe Bowman of Federal Way’s Integrity Life Church, noting that Black history is American history. Bowman said he looks forward to seeing the city take further steps to serve the African American people in Federal Way.

Read the full proclamation on page 3 of the City of Federal Way Feb. 2. meeting agenda.


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