Federal Way scholars participate in Hour of Code, a global event that took place during Computer Science Education Week Dec. 3–9. Photo courtesy of Federal Way Public Schools

Federal Way scholars participate in Hour of Code, a global event that took place during Computer Science Education Week Dec. 3–9. Photo courtesy of Federal Way Public Schools

Scholars join in Hour of Code to enhance computer science skills

The Hour of Code is designed to demystify code and show anybody can learn computer science.

Technology is transforming every industry across the world. In 2015, 7 million openings in the U.S. were in occupations — from art and design to medicine to banking — that value coding skills. In order to prepare for a future where computer science skills are essential, Federal Way Public Schools scholars participated in Hour of Code, a global event that took place during Computer Science Education Week Dec. 3–9.

The Hour of Code is designed to demystify code and show anybody can learn computer science. This year, 15,504 FWPS scholars in kindergarten through 12th grade learned the basics of programming through exercises like creating a mobile app, building a game, solving code puzzles and coding competitions. These experiences help scholars build skills that connect to post-secondary education and careers.

This effort is in support of the district’s strategic plan Goal 5, Persistence to Graduation: High School Graduation through Successful Transitions.

“During Hour of Code I learned you can’t give up until you get your code to work as intended. Also, you are in control of the code and it can do all things, thanks to your creativity,” Jessie Beeler, fourth grade student, Woodmont K-8, said in a FWPS press release.

“I love computer science because it’s like learning a new language and I think that’s really cool. The first thing I learned was you must have perseverance because sometimes it’s hard to figure out something or get something to work. I plan to continue coding because I like learning what’s happening behind the screen,” Patrick Davalos-Palestino, ninth grade student, Thomas Jefferson High School.

Computer science develops students’ critical thinking and computational skills and shows them how to create new technologies. It encompasses the study of computers and algorithmic processes, including principles, software and hardware designs, applications, and the impact on society.

The community is invited to attend the third annual science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) Exploration Night from 6-8 p.m. March 27 at Federal Way High School.

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