Federal Way City Councilmember Martin Moore identifies top threats the city faces during a City Council retreat last Saturday at the Dumas Bay Centre. The council set its vision and goals during the retreat. Heidi Sanders, the Mirror

Federal Way City Councilmember Martin Moore identifies top threats the city faces during a City Council retreat last Saturday at the Dumas Bay Centre. The council set its vision and goals during the retreat. Heidi Sanders, the Mirror

Federal Way City Council sets vision, goals

Sustainable revenue, ecomonic development and reducing homlessness are top priorities.

The Federal Way City Council plans to focus on sustainable revenue sources, economic development and reducing homelessness for the next couple of years.

The council outlined its top three priorities and created a vision for the city during a day-long retreat Feb. 3 at the Dumas Bay Centre.

The vision statement that came out of the retreat is “Federal Way will be the most inclusive, responsive and safe city in the region.”

The city hired Andrew Ballard, chief growth strategist with Mill Creek-based Marketing Solutions, for $2,500 to facilitate the retreat. Ballard led the council and Mayor Jim Ferrell in brainstorming sessions to create the vision statement; identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats the city faces; and set and prioritize goals.

The goals outlined are to increase sustainable revenue streams to fully fund the city budget and programs, enhance economic development activities to maximize opportunities in Federal Way, and develop a plan to reduce homelessness.

The council identified about 20 other goals, many of which fall under the top-three priorities.

Generating revenue came out as the top priority as the city begins the process of drafting its 2019-20 budget.

“We need to look at revenue sources,” said council member Dini Duclos, who chairs the council’s finance committee. “We cannot afford to lose staff because we are not paying them … and we need more staff.”

The council will use the information gathered at the retreat to create strategies to implement its goals as well as create a set of core values.

Federal Way Finance Director Ade Ariwoola told the council he hopes the vision will serve as a framework for the budget process.

“Please take it a step further, and let’s try to build a budget that supports your vision,” he said. “Your job is to come up with a vision. The job of the directors is to get you there.”

The format for the retreat differed from previous years, Deputy Mayor Susan Honda said.

“They were a rehash of council meetings,” Honda said of past retreats. “Instead of a 15-minute report, (there was) maybe an hour and half report from the directors. For several years, we have been asking to have a retreat where we learn how to work with each other and come up with our goals and our vision. This was the year to do it.”

Ferrell said he would like to see more community involvement in the visioning process in the future.

“Next year, we really want to have the public that shows up have an impact on the priorities,” he said. “That will be instructive for us. Everybody sees life from different perspectives. The most important thing is we need to keep in mind we work for the residents, so we want them here.”

A full report from the retreat will be posted on the city’s website, cityoffederalway.com, and its social media channels.

More in News

Southbound traffic backs up as northbound drivers cruise on with ease on the Highway 99 viaduct on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
WSDOT hopes ‘Viadoom’ habits continue

The department credits commuters with adapting to the closure and mitigating impacts.

Federal Way unifies in prayer

“Unity in Prayer” service raises $10,000 for Multi-Service Center.

President’s emergency declaration sparks immediate legal backlash

Attorney General Bob Ferguson said his team will sue the White House if federal funds originally intended for Washington state are interrupted.

Olympic View fifth-grader is positive presence in the classroom

This month’s Scholar of the Month is fifth-grader Forsina Rabauliman.

Moms create autism art walk to benefit special needs classrooms

Autism Auction and Art Walk happens Feb. 24 in Federal Way.

Courtesy photo by Why Not You Foundation
                                Russell Wilson and Ciara unveil the limited edition King County System Library cards that feature them and their dreams Friday at the Tukwila Library. The new library cards coincide with the newly launched DREAM BIG: Anything is Possible campaign.
Russell Wilson and Ciara launch DREAM BIG campaign

Partnership with King County libraries dovetails with scholarship program for local students.

Bill targets sexual health curriculum in Washington schools

Senate Bill 5395 is co-sponsored by 17 Democratic representatives and introduced by Sen. Claire Wilson, D-Federal Way.

According to King County’s Mental Illness and Drug Dependency (MIDD) annual report, Seattle had the highest rate of people using services at 36 percent of the total, followed by 31 percent from South King County, 18 percent from the greater Eastside, and 7 percent from north county including Shoreline.
Study shows King County’s treatment funding is making progress

A document on the county’s .1 percent health sales tax was accepted Wednesday by the county council.

Most Read