A rendering of what the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe’s new 18-story, 400-room hotel resort will look like when it is expected to open in 2021, next to its main casino in Auburn. COURTESY IMAGE, Tribe/Smarthouse Creative

A rendering of what the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe’s new 18-story, 400-room hotel resort will look like when it is expected to open in 2021, next to its main casino in Auburn. COURTESY IMAGE, Tribe/Smarthouse Creative

State Department of Commerce announces $5 million emergency response grant for tribes

All tribal communities across the state will have access to funding to help with COVID-19 response

The Washington State Department of Commerce announced on Thursday $5 million in emergency grants is now available to the 29 federally recognized tribes in the state to bolster their response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“These funds are immediately accessible to tribal governments coping with severe impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Commerce Director Lisa Brown in a Commerce news release. “From food distribution and isolation housing to medical equipment and services for vulnerable members, the grants will strengthen tribal communities all across the state.”

Each tribal government will receive an immediate grant of $100,000, with the remaining $2.1 million distributed based on a formula currently under development between Commerce and tribal leaders.

Eligible expenses and activities covered under the grant include but are not limited to:

* Costs to address public health needs in response to the COVID-19 outbreak and its impacts

* The creation and operation of isolation and quarantine housing

* Costs associated with the increased demand for social programs, such as elder care services, food distribution or behavioral health services

* Costs associated with assisting people experiencing homelessness or housing instability and needing physical distancing and other preventative measures

* Procurement of health care equipment, including telehealth equipment and licenses

* Unemployment match required under the federal CARES Act

* Purchase of personal protective equipment (PPE), cleaning and sanitation supplies

* Costs related to COVID -19 testing

* Other expenses in agreement with the Department of Commerce

“COVID-19 knows no political, geographic or cultural boundaries,” said Commerce tribal liaison Ernie Rasmussen. “This government-to-government effort to combat the impacts of COVID-19 is a testament to the human partnership necessary to succeed in our attempts to return every community to normalcy as quickly as possible.”

“The COVID-19 crisis is having disastrous impacts on tribes throughout the state,” said W. Ron Allen, Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal chair and CEO. “While other states are leaving tribes to fend for themselves, Washington is partnering to distribute state coronavirus relief funds to help mitigate the pandemic’s impact to our tribal governments and communities. We are deeply appreciative of this assistance.”


Talk to us

Please share your story tips by emailing editor@federalwaymirror.com.

To share your opinion for publication, submit a letter through our website https://www.federalwaymirror.com/submit-letter/. Include your name, address and daytime phone number. (We’ll only publish your name and hometown.) Please keep letters to 300 words or less.

More in Northwest

Stock photo
State health experts: Flu vaccine should be considered ‘essential’ this year

Presence of COVID-19, flu viruses could put more people in the hospital

Washington teacher’s upbeat lesson goes viral on TikTok

A video posted by kindergarten teacher Mackenzie Adams has been viewed more than 10 million times.

King County Metro bus fares resume Oct. 1

Fares were suspended in March due to COVID-19

Washington State Capitol Building in Olympia. File photo
Surge in consumer spending eases state budget challenges

A jump in tax collections cuts a projected $9 billion shortfall in half, acccording to new forecast.

High speed rail and hub cities explored in Cascadia Corridor study

A new paper outlines a potential plan for the region.

Dan Satterberg
Satterberg responds to ‘anarchist jurisdictions’ label by DOJ

Prosecutor refutes allegation that laws are not being enforced in King County

Should state cover school bus costs if there are no riders?

With funding tied to getting students to school, districts are uncertain how much money they’ll receive.

Why is COVID-19 more severe in men and elders? | UW Medicine

SARS-CoV-2 usually triggers a strong immune response, but less so in men and people over 60

Seven decades later, the search for two missing Navy pilots continues

The pilots are thought to have disappeared near Black Lake, northeast of North Bend.

Most Read