Sports

SIDELINES: Marine Hills, Twin Lakes, Caddyshack and Peanut Man

For some reason, they kind of remind me of the movie “Caddyshack” — they being the Twin Lakes Golf and Country Club and the Marine Hills Swim and Tennis Club.

I kind of expected some stiff-body to greet me with a hearty “Ahoy, Malloy” while puffing on a pipe, wearing an ascot and a white captain’s hat and giving a Judge Smails-esque blessing:

“It’s easy to grin, when your ship comes in, and you’ve got the stock market beat. But the man worth while, is the man who can smile, when his shorts are too tight in the seat.”

But Twin Lakes and Marine Hills aren’t like Caddyshack’s Bushwood Country Club in the slightest. Not stuffy, not elitist, and I’m pretty sure neither has a member named Spaulding or Lacey Underall.

I’m also quite confident that you won’t find any Baby Ruths floating around either of the pools, and Carl Spackler will not supply any “Cinderella stories” on the Twin Lakes golf course.

Federal Way is extremely lucky to have these two “clubs” within the city limits. The Twin Lakes and Marine Hills clubs are the center of those two communities, especially during the summer months. They both feature well-attended swimming programs for boys and girls, along with swim lessons and other programs. And both offer these programs to people who don’t live in the Marine Hills or Twin Lakes communities, which is a huge bonus.

The Marine Hills Swim and Tennis Club has been around since 1963. The club operates seven days a week throughout the summer, offering a variety of outdoor activities for the entire family.

Marine Hills has a five-lane, 25-yard heated pool, a fenced-in baby pool, two tennis courts, a basketball hoop, a pickle ball court and an upper deck for barbecues and picnics. The club offers competitive swimming, water polo and tennis teams.

Twin Lakes is pretty much the same, except they have an 18-hole golf course along with the other amenities. Twin Lakes also has the capacity to host weddings and banquets.

So, Federal Way, take advantage of these two clubs. A lot of other cities don’t have places like these.

In other news:

• Can this season get any worse for the Seattle Mariners? The answer is yes.

First it was Dave Niehaus, and now Rick “Peanut Man” Kaminski.

Although Kaminski never announced a game or wore a Seattle Mariners uniform, he was still one of the most popular figures to ever step into the Kingdome and Safeco Field. Kaminski, known as The Peanut Man by Mariners fans who have been entertained by him since the team’s first season in 1977, died Wednesday. Kaminski, 67, was hospitalized recently after a brain aneurysm. His partner, Candi Mindt-Keener, announced Wednesday that he died overnight at Evergreen Medical Center.

“On behalf of everyone at the Seattle Mariners, our deepest sympathies go out to Rick Kaminski’s partner Candi, his family, his many friends, and fans,” Mariners President Chuck Armstrong said in a statement. “Rick was a fixture at Seattle sporting events for as long as I can remember. His speed and accuracy with a bag of peanuts was matched by his quick wit and smile. He always seemed happy to see you, even if he was meeting you for the first time. Rick loved what he did and the fans loved him for it. He will be sorely missed at Safeco Field as well as Peoria, Arizona, where he got in his ‘Spring Training’ along with everyone else.”

The Peanut Man was known for his antics with a bag of peanuts. It was a right of passage at a Mariners’ game to raise your hand and have Rick hit you perfectly with a bag tossed behind his back.

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