Goats are an environmentally friendly way to keep blackberry bushes in check on Highline College’s campus. They will also be part of the college’s upcoming Urban Agriculture Food Summit, where attendees can learn how to keep and milk goats in the city. Photo courtesy of Highline College

Goats are an environmentally friendly way to keep blackberry bushes in check on Highline College’s campus. They will also be part of the college’s upcoming Urban Agriculture Food Summit, where attendees can learn how to keep and milk goats in the city. Photo courtesy of Highline College

Goats, greenhouses, gardening at free summit

King Conservation District and Highline College Partner for Urban Ag Event

From growing herbs and grafting apple trees to keeping goats and chickens in the city, a two-day summit will explore several topics for budding and experienced gardeners alike. Attendees will find experts, resources and hands-on workshops at the South King County Urban Agriculture Food Summit, May 31 and June 1, at Highline College.

Now in its third year, the free summit is open to all who want to make the most of a small urban garden. The two-day event will feature resource tables with information and activities ranging from small business development to native pollinator habitat. Experts will be available to talk about ideas.

One goal of the summit is to increase awareness and opportunities to develop urban agriculture in a region of King County that is recognized as a food desert.

The event is made possible through the college’s partnerships with organizations such as King Conservation District and is organized by Highline’s Urban Agriculture program.

Other participating businesses and organizations include Elk Run Farm, Herbal Elements, Jimm Harrison Phytotherapy Institute, Mace Foods, Scratch and Peck Feeds, Stone Soup Gardens, StartZone, United Way Benefits Hub and Wakulima USA.

South King County Urban Agriculture Food Summit Schedule

Summit will be held in Building 2 on the college’s main campus in Des Moines, located midway between Seattle and Tacoma at South 240th Street and Pacific Highway South (Highway 99). All activities are free and open to the public.

Friday, May 31

1–2:45 p.m.

Herbs 101: Hear an introduction to the benefits of growing and using your own herbs, followed by a demonstration of cooking with herbs.

2:45–4 p.m.

Apple Tree Workshop: Learn how to make your own fruit tree through a process called grafting in this interactive workshop.

Saturday, June 1

9:30 a.m.

Check in starts.

10–10:50 a.m.

Essential Oils: Learn to use and create them through steam distillation.

11–11:50 a.m.

Native Pollinators: Learn to create and use pollinator habitat with small farm crops.

12–12:50 p.m.

Goats in the City: Learn about keeping and milking goats in the city.

1–1:50 p.m.

Chickens 101: Learn how to keep chickens (and collect the eggs!).

2–2:50 p.m.

Introduction to Greenhouses: Learn the tricks of how to use this urban ag tool.

3–3:50 p.m.

Jobs in Agriculture: Join us for a facilitated discussion.

More in News

Homelessness authority approved by King County, awaits Seattle vote

The agreement would consolidate emergency services for people experiencing homelessness.

Vote for Best of Federal Way 2020

Vote for your favorite Federal Way restaurants, businesses, community leaders and more.

Don’t forget: Vote for Best of Federal Way businesses, leaders and more

Click here to vote for your favorite Federal Way restaurants, businesses, community leaders and more.

Suspect leaves pile of pork bones, rotting meat on doorstep

Victim thinks pile of bones, and bag of bones and rotting meat was harassment.

Federal Way school district breaks ground on Thomas Jefferson High School rebuild

The district expects the new building to open by fall 2021.

The King County Courthouse is located at 516 Third Ave. in downtown Seattle. Photo courtesy of King County
Council approves $600,000 to increase security at King County Courthouse

The funding will be split evenly between increasing deputies, security and social services.

Victims, law enforcement speak about King County Courthouse conditions

An entrance to the courthouse was closed after an assault.

In this September 2019 photo, George Kirkish, owner and founder of Palouse Winery on Vashon-Maury Island, pours a glass of wine for Lori Coots during tasting room hours. (Kevin Opsahl/Sound Publishing)
King County Council approves controversial winery, brewery ordinance

After five years, the county has updated regulations surrounding alcohol production and tasting.

Police investigating shooting threats written on bathroom mirror at Todd Beamer High School

Federal Way police ramped up security on campus Monday, and will continue to do so on Tuesday as well.

Most Read