Goats are an environmentally friendly way to keep blackberry bushes in check on Highline College’s campus. They will also be part of the college’s upcoming Urban Agriculture Food Summit, where attendees can learn how to keep and milk goats in the city. Photo courtesy of Highline College

Goats are an environmentally friendly way to keep blackberry bushes in check on Highline College’s campus. They will also be part of the college’s upcoming Urban Agriculture Food Summit, where attendees can learn how to keep and milk goats in the city. Photo courtesy of Highline College

Goats, greenhouses, gardening at free summit

King Conservation District and Highline College Partner for Urban Ag Event

From growing herbs and grafting apple trees to keeping goats and chickens in the city, a two-day summit will explore several topics for budding and experienced gardeners alike. Attendees will find experts, resources and hands-on workshops at the South King County Urban Agriculture Food Summit, May 31 and June 1, at Highline College.

Now in its third year, the free summit is open to all who want to make the most of a small urban garden. The two-day event will feature resource tables with information and activities ranging from small business development to native pollinator habitat. Experts will be available to talk about ideas.

One goal of the summit is to increase awareness and opportunities to develop urban agriculture in a region of King County that is recognized as a food desert.

The event is made possible through the college’s partnerships with organizations such as King Conservation District and is organized by Highline’s Urban Agriculture program.

Other participating businesses and organizations include Elk Run Farm, Herbal Elements, Jimm Harrison Phytotherapy Institute, Mace Foods, Scratch and Peck Feeds, Stone Soup Gardens, StartZone, United Way Benefits Hub and Wakulima USA.

South King County Urban Agriculture Food Summit Schedule

Summit will be held in Building 2 on the college’s main campus in Des Moines, located midway between Seattle and Tacoma at South 240th Street and Pacific Highway South (Highway 99). All activities are free and open to the public.

Friday, May 31

1–2:45 p.m.

Herbs 101: Hear an introduction to the benefits of growing and using your own herbs, followed by a demonstration of cooking with herbs.

2:45–4 p.m.

Apple Tree Workshop: Learn how to make your own fruit tree through a process called grafting in this interactive workshop.

Saturday, June 1

9:30 a.m.

Check in starts.

10–10:50 a.m.

Essential Oils: Learn to use and create them through steam distillation.

11–11:50 a.m.

Native Pollinators: Learn to create and use pollinator habitat with small farm crops.

12–12:50 p.m.

Goats in the City: Learn about keeping and milking goats in the city.

1–1:50 p.m.

Chickens 101: Learn how to keep chickens (and collect the eggs!).

2–2:50 p.m.

Introduction to Greenhouses: Learn the tricks of how to use this urban ag tool.

3–3:50 p.m.

Jobs in Agriculture: Join us for a facilitated discussion.

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