Building sets and Hang-Gliding on Weekends

Glenn Duval is November Citizen of the Month.

Glenn Duval spends his time hang gliding when he’s not building the set for “Rapunzel,” Centerstage’s holiday pantomime opening Nov. 30. Photo courtesy of Trista Duval

Glenn Duval spends his time hang gliding when he’s not building the set for “Rapunzel,” Centerstage’s holiday pantomime opening Nov. 30. Photo courtesy of Trista Duval

Glenn Duval, Federal Way resident of seven years, is the Mirror’s Citizen of the Month for November. Read on to find out more about what Glenn does for the community.

Q: How long has it taken you to build the set for Centerstage’s “Rapunzel”?

A: By opening night, Duval said he’ll probably log 80-plus hours of time working on the set.

Q: What different set pieces have you been working on?

A: He helped build three rolling set pieces on wheels for the play. Essentially it’s a scene on one side while the piece is unfolded.

Q: Why devote so much of your time to this?

A: “Because I love my daughter, and she needed help,” he said of his daughter Trista Duval, the artistic director for Centerstage Theatre.

Q: Have you helped with any other events like this in the community?

A: When Duval and his wife first moved here, he worked closely with Shelley Pauls and her husband Dwight building houses for Habitat for Humanity.

Q: How long have you lived in the community?

A: Duval said he moved here with his wife seven years ago because his daughter moved out here, wanted to start a family and told him she wanted them to be closer.

Q: Where do you work?

A: Duval works as a tool designer for Boeing in Everett.

Q: Do you have a hobby?

A: Duval enjoys hang gliding, but never had much opportunity to do it while he was still living in New England, he said. About 10 years ago for his birthday, he said his wife and kids bought him a skydiving package, and while he was floating down he thought, “This is awesome,” and decided he wanted to pursue hang gliding again. After he moved to the area, he was able to start hang gliding again, and now he goes every weekend he can when the weather is nice.

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