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Organic blueberry farm sits on a patch of heaven

The Higher Taste Organic Blueberry Farm is currently looking for volunteers to help remove weeds from the berry bushes. The farm will return the favor by giving out free berries during the summer. The place will be open for the public seven days a week from June to October.  - Aileen Charleston/The Mirror
The Higher Taste Organic Blueberry Farm is currently looking for volunteers to help remove weeds from the berry bushes. The farm will return the favor by giving out free berries during the summer. The place will be open for the public seven days a week from June to October.
— image credit: Aileen Charleston/The Mirror

Volunteers who remove

invasive weeds can pick fruit for free

In a corner close to North Military Road and Lake Dolloff Elementary School hides a blueberry paradise for anyone who has a love of natural escapades.

The Higher Taste Blueberry Farm is one of Federal Way’s many hidden treasures. The owner of this five-acre property, Mary King, said that the only reason she was able to acquire the land five years ago was because of all the spiritual coincidences that worked in her favor.

“I had looked at over 50 places with lakes, until I found this one on Lake Dolloff, which was my favorite lake here,” King said. “When I bought it from the last owner, he told me I was buying his piece of heaven on Earth.”

The farm has an almost uncountable number of blueberry plants covering the entire area. Not only are there surrounding farms with animals decorating the place, but it’s also embellished by tall trees and the picturesque view of Lake Dolloff.

King said that because the farm is entirely organic, she needs to remove manually all invasive weeds from her blueberry bushes.

She is now looking for volunteers to help her with this task. To those who help, she will return the favor by letting them pick berries for free during the summer.

The Higher Taste farm is typically open for the public seven days a week from the beginning of June until the beginning of October.

King said that many people who live around the area are devotees of the farm — and simply love the flavor of the blueberries grown there.

“One person told me that the reason why they were so tasty was because the bushes were near the water,” King said. “Many times people that pick blueberries here don’t even know there’s water because the bushes block the view.”

The amount charged at the farm for every pound of blueberries is $4, but for those who pick them on their own, the price is $2 a pound.

“At the supermarket, blueberries can be so expensive, even more if they’re organic. The next cheapest to this is the (Federal Way) Farmers Market, where you still pay about $6.50 a pound,” King said. “Picking berries here is a good deal, plus it’s a great place to visit.”

King also mentioned that blueberries are one of the most powerful antioxidants, and that they are linked to helping prevent cancer and diseases that come with age.

“We’re certified organic and can’t use any sprays. It’s all manual — that makes the berries have a better quality and taste,” King said.

Although King has owned the place for a relatively short time, she is aware that many years ago the farm was used for a number of community events.

She is open to the possibility of lending the place for either community events or private parties.

“It would be a great place for weddings,” King said. “It’s an amazing place and it’d be nice to eventually move here one day.”

Contact Aileen Charleston: acharleston@fedwaymirror.com

For more information about volunteering or visiting the Higher Taste Blueberry Farm, call (206) 579-0214

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