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Federal Way man accused of poisoning wife faces second trial

UPDATE: King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg announced Tuesday that the courts will retry Joseph Naimo, a Federal Way man accused of poisoning his wife. A trial date has yet to be set.

(Original report below)

From staff reports:

A 12-person jury announced Oct. 20 it was split 9 to 3 in its decision to convict Joseph Naimo, 63, in the first-degree murder of his wife. A mistrial was declared.

The jury began deliberating the case Oct. 12. It was unable to unanimously decide whether it had been proven without a doubt that Naimo, of Federal Way, had poisoned his wife.

Ann Marie Naimo, 53, died from ingesting strychnine, a substance used to kill pests, on Nov. 28, 2008. Joseph Naimo, a pest control manager with decades of experience in the field, was the only person with Ann when she passed. Toxicology tests revealed Ann, an alcoholic, also had alcohol and prescription medications in her system when she died.

During the trial, which lasted nearly two months, the prosecution argued that Naimo, who was in close contact with a female friend of Ann's in the month proceeding her death, killed his wife. The defense argued Ann ingested the strychnine herself, committing suicide.

Dan Donohoe, King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office spokesman, said his office will review the case and decide within two weeks whether to retry Naimo.

Click here to read a recent Mirror report about the case.

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