Lifestyle

Church leaders back same-sex marriage

Mirror staff

More than 160 religious leaders from across Washington rallied Tuesday in Seattle, calling on local, state and national leaders to denounce the proposed constitutional amendment prohibiting same-sex marriage.

The leaders included James Kubal-Komoto, reverend of Saltwater Unitarian Universalist Church in Des Moines.

The coalition gathered at Plymouth Congregational Church to read a statement to reporters in support of extending the right to marry to gay couples.

Following the press conference, the religious leaders led a procession to present their statement to Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels and King County Executive Ron Sims. The statement will also be given to Governor Gary Locke and members of the Legislature, organizers said.

The faiths of coalition members who signed the statement include Jewish, Buddhist and Christian (Episcopal, Presbyterian, Lutheran, Baptist, Methodist, Unitarian Universalist and United Church of Christ).

“Restricting the right of any couple to make a covenant of love and commitment to form families through marriage is an unconscionable violation of religious freedom,” said Rabbi Jonathan Singer of Temple Beth Am.

The statement calls upon Washington’s congressional delegation to oppose discrimination against same-sex couples who want to be married.

“Our faith calls us to speak out against the discrimination in the proposed federal marriage amendment to the U.S. Constitution and in Washington state’s Defense of Marriage Act,” said Rev. Shannon Anderson of Central Lutheran Church.

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