Arts and Entertainment

Soloist gets a new violin---free

For the Mirror

Working with young people to help them achieve their musical dreams is a big part of what the Hammond Ashley Violin company does.

Each of their staff members is a string instrument teacher. The violin company works with many of the local youth symphonies in the Puget Sound area, as well as with professional orchestras such as Federal Way Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Bellevue Philharmonic, and Tacoma Symphony.

Recently, upon hearing about a young visiting violin soloist from the Ukraine and his search for a better violin, Hammond Ashley jumped into the philanthropic circle, as well.

Sergey Suhobrusov, 19, a guest soloist with the Federal Way Symphony –– they performed together last December, and he’ll solo tomorrow at Knutzen Family Theater –– returned to Federal Way recently to pursue his musical career by working with musicians from the symphony, concertmaster Yuriy Mikhlin. Suhobrusov’s violin is an old surplus violin owned by Russia, where he studies, and won’t stand up well in any more of the competitions that he enters to further his career as a solo violinist, according to symphony officials.

So Hammond Ashley offered to donate a violin to Suhobrusov. The young violinist visited the company’s store to select a violin from a group of instruments chosen by manager Bryce Van Parys to fit his specific needs.

The donation was a complete surprise to Suhobrusov, who had trouble believing that a violin company would take an interest in him and donate a violin. He commented that he had no words to express his thanks.

He will return to Moscow after the Fourth of July holiday with two violins –– his old one, which he must take back with him, and his donated instrument from Hammond Ashley.

Suhobrusov’s performance tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Knutzen with a piano accompanist will be followed by a reception. Donations of $10 will be accepted at the door.t In time for show at Knutzen

For the Mirror

Working with young people to help them achieve their musical dreams is a big part of what the Hammond Ashley Violin company does.

Each of their staff members is a string instrument teacher. The violin company works with many of the local youth symphonies in the Puget Sound area, as well as with professional orchestras such as Federal Way Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Bellevue Philharmonic, and Tacoma Symphony.

Recently, upon hearing about a young visiting violin soloist from the Ukraine and his search for a better violin, Hammond Ashley jumped into the philanthropic circle, as well.

Sergey Suhobrusov, 19, a guest soloist with the Federal Way Symphony –– they performed together last December, and he’ll solo tomorrow at Knutzen Family Theater –– returned to Federal Way recently to pursue his musical career by working with musicians from the symphony, concertmaster Yuriy Mikhlin. Suhobrusov’s violin is an old surplus violin owned by Russia, where he studies, and won’t stand up well in any more of the competitions that he enters to further his career as a solo violinist, according to symphony officials.

So Hammond Ashley offered to donate a violin to Suhobrusov. The young violinist visited the company’s store to select a violin from a group of instruments chosen by manager Bryce Van Parys to fit his specific needs.

The donation was a complete surprise to Suhobrusov, who had trouble believing that a violin company would take an interest in him and donate a violin. He commented that he had no words to express his thanks.

He will return to Moscow after the Fourth of July holiday with two violins –– his old one, which he must take back with him, and his donated instrument from Hammond Ashley.

Suhobrusov’s performance tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Knutzen with a piano accompanist will be followed by a reception. Donations of $10 will be accepted at the door.

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