Community

World Vision hosts famine in support of Haiti

Orecchi Debras, 8, waits outside Peace Hospital in Port au Prince, Haiti, to be treated Jan. 19. Debras was taken to the hospital by his parents. There was no room inside for patients. World Vision delivered a truck load of medical supplies, including gloves, plaster for casts, drugs and bandages to the hospital the same day. - Courtesy of World Vision. Photo by Jon Warren/World Vision.
Orecchi Debras, 8, waits outside Peace Hospital in Port au Prince, Haiti, to be treated Jan. 19. Debras was taken to the hospital by his parents. There was no room inside for patients. World Vision delivered a truck load of medical supplies, including gloves, plaster for casts, drugs and bandages to the hospital the same day.
— image credit: Courtesy of World Vision. Photo by Jon Warren/World Vision.

Throughout the country, hundreds of thousands of teens will go hungry during the World Vision 30 Hour Famine, and this year part of the funds will go toward Haiti's long-term recovery.

On Feb. 26-27, American teens will participate in the famine, not eating for 30 hours and getting a taste of what the world's poorest children face. During that time, the teens drink only water and juice and participate in community service events.

Since 1992, students have raised more than $130 million worldwide. In 2009, 30-Hour Famine raised close to $11 million. This year’s goal is to raise $12 million. World Vision works in nearly 100 countries, helping approximately 100 million people.

The money goes to children and families in Haiti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Uganda, Sudan, Mauritania, Pakistan, Zambia, Zimbabwe and other targeted spots where famine, conflict and other crises make children vulnerable.

World Vision has been working in Haiti for more than 30 years. This year, in addition to addressing immediate relief needs, 30-Hour Famine funds will be spent on long-term needs in Haiti such as food rations to children and mothers and HIV-positive adults, fruit trees, small-scale drip irrigation, guinea fowl and pigs, construction of eight new clinics (serving 55,000) and a new pharmacy, immunizations and more.

Visit www.30hourfamine.org or call (800) 7-FAMINE for more information.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Jul 18 edition online now. Browse the archives.