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Fraternity recognizes three Federal Way graduating seniors

Right to left, Devin Pegues, Jaylon Bond and Kenai Brazier, were recently awarded scholarships. - Contributed photo
Right to left, Devin Pegues, Jaylon Bond and Kenai Brazier, were recently awarded scholarships.
— image credit: Contributed photo

The Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity recently recognized and rewarded three Federal Way graduating seniors for their scholastic achievements.

Jaylon Bond, a graduate of TAF Academy, earned a 3.91 GPA and was awarded the Melvin Minnis Scholarship. Bond will be attending Howard University in the fall and plans to major in biology and minor in chemistry. Through an internship at the Fred Hutchinson Research Center, Bond has worked in a research lab for three years sequencing DNA, cloning bacteria and isolating genes.

He hopes to become a full-fledged biochemist and return to the Hutch where he will advocate and raise funds to expand the work done in the research center.

Kenai Brazier, a graduate of Federal Way High School, earned a 3.16 GPA and was awarded the David Davidson Scholarship. Brazier will be attending Cornish College of the Arts in the fall and plans to focus on graphic design.

Brazier hopes his artwork will awaken a multitude of reactions in those who view his work. His current work has already been chosen for display at the Seattle Art Museum and the Tacoma Museum of Glass.

One of his designs has garnered a Golden Key Winner in the Western Region Scholastic Young Artist Competition.

Devin Pegues, a graduate of Federal Way High School, earned a 3.85 GPA and was awarded the Emil Pitre Scholarship. Pegues will be attending the University of Washington in the fall and plans to major in electrical engineering, a dream that started at the age of 10 when he met his mentor.

Pegues states that his inspiration to pursue electrical engineering affords the chance to represent the traditionally underrepresented people of color in this field of study.

His long-term goal is to prove that people of color can be successful in science, engineering and technology fields. He plans to use his future success to promote these fields of study to other students of color throughout his life.

 

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