Business

Poverty Bay Coffee doubles in size with new cafe

A ribbon cutting ceremony was held Saturday for the new cafe at Poverty Bay Coffee, 1108 S. 322nd Place behind the 320th Street Safeway in Federal Way. Several local dignitaries attended the celebration.  - Andy Hobbs/The Mirror
A ribbon cutting ceremony was held Saturday for the new cafe at Poverty Bay Coffee, 1108 S. 322nd Place behind the 320th Street Safeway in Federal Way. Several local dignitaries attended the celebration.
— image credit: Andy Hobbs/The Mirror

Poverty Bay Coffee officially unveiled its new cafe Saturday in Federal Way.

The coffee shop, located at 1108 S. 322nd Place behind the 320th Street Safeway, has doubled its area and seating capacity.

The 1,500-square-foot expansion includes a cafe with big windows, a bigger lunch menu, classic brown wood booths, chairs and tables, all flanked by a service counter that offers Northwest beers and wine. At the Saturday celebration, baristas pulled espresso shots in the original section of Poverty Bay Coffee while residents noshed on goodies in both halves of the shop.

The coffee shop, owned by Alice and Dan Olmstead, is a popular meeting place for Federal Way locals. The atmosphere of the new cafe lives up to Poverty Bay’s “Cozy Coffee and Great Food” mantra that now adorns the building’s exterior. The remodeled building also added food storage, kitchen gear and a grill.

In the future, Poverty Bay owners plan to add evening hours, a dinner menu and acoustic music events.

“What we knew we needed from the day we opened was a little more elbow room,” said Dan Olmstead, adding that the current site opened in 2002 after years as a kiosk in the adjacent Safeway parking lot. “I do know when people came here for lunch, way too often during that lunch peak, they couldn’t get a table. This will make it a more comfortable place for people to meet.”

Poverty Bay Coffee is named after a local body of water. This local micro-roaster specializes in sustainable shade-grown coffee, which is found in high altitudes under the canopy of larger plants and trees. Poverty Bay began this organic practice in 1997, and has direct relationships with farmers in Mexico and Peru.

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